Are you a fresh graduate and you do not know what to do when it comes to choosing a job? Or you've been working for a few years, but you feel you do not find yourself in the role you have now. You're looking for something else ... but it's so hard to define that something else.

Many CV models include a heading called "Personal Statement" or "Professional Objective". But, unfortunately, its content for most young people is nothing more than a perpetuation of the same idea or formulations because it "sounds good." Very few are the young people who think as soon as the faculty finishes about their professional career. Very few are those who make an analysis of their strengths and weaknesses and especially of the values and motivations they have. A lot of people accept a job or another because it's convenient, it's at hand, the wage package is motivating ... forgetting to think ahead.

Thus, over 3-5 years they feel completely demotivated and unable to bring added value in the field in which they work. We know you do not want to get there. Loadjobs Group offers some tips to help you become your own "driver" for your professional development:

1. Self-evaluation

First, you need to know your strengths and weak points. So be ready at any time to put your strengths in the light, but also to take care of your development from those weak points. Both have to be constantly in your attention: both can help you in choosing the professional path to the same extent as you can be hindered if they are not properly managed. Another aspect that you need to keep in mind is that of values and motivations: what you enjoy doing and what you do not do, what motivates you and what not, what values you valorize, etc.

2. Planning

Just as we do not go to the market without a specific goal, so we have to do when we enter the labor market - we must have a goal in mind. What do we propose? What do we want to do in the next few years? A successful career is not always the result of careful planning, but it builds on an overall picture, a general purpose. Define, then, your professional goal. Take a moment to think! There is something to be done from one day to the next.

Loadjobs Group's HR specialists say that you will know that you are ready to plan your personal route when you have answers to questions like what (activities) I like to do and would also bring satisfaction to me in the future, which are the areas where can they develop these interests, where can they find these opportunities, what are the things I have to do to facilitate, support my goals, etc.?

3. Opportunities

There is an old saying that "All that glitters is not gold". This is about the opportunities: you have to be careful that the job offer you have received is indeed an opportunity for you. Does it align with your professional goal, with the direction you want to grow and help you reach it faster? Or it's just one of those moments of opportunity that you do not have to fall prey to. In the short term, they can be dressed in a polish to take your eyes, but in the long run, they can be true "traps."

career, job, personal statement, professional objective, self-evaluation, opportunities